Nettle Tea

When it comes to allergy relief, Nettle Tea is the king remedy if you want to avoid any post potential side effects. Besides helping cure allergy, Nettle Tea has other health benefits as well. An interesting thing about this tea that you might hear of is that this the nettle stings before it is made to tea. Want to know why? Come with me!

What Is Nettle Tea

Reavealed by Nettle Tea blogger Ilmdamaily,

Some incredible nettle tea discoveries are discussedThe stinging nettle – urtica dioica in Latin – is typically considered a weed. Growing to approximately 1 – 2 m in the right conditions, stinging nettles are a hardy plant with a tendency to grow almost anywhere.

Where Can I Find it?

Stinging nettle is easy to find in temperate climates. It tends to grow everywhere, though grows particularly well in areas of recently disturbed soil, road verges, forgotten parts of the back garden, or in an ungrazed paddock – basically anywhere it is not actively prevented from growing.

Ouch! How Can I Stop the Stinging?

Be careful when picking stinging nettle! As the name suggests, being pricked by it does sting – particularly if you are unaccustomed to stinging plants.

To stop the stinging from this plant if you become affected in the course of picking it for your stinging nettle tea,  simply break open the stem of the nettle – again, taking care to avoid further stings! – to release the liquid inside the stem. The liquid inside the stem of the stinging nettle acts as a natural antidote to the irritant poison of the leaves.

Of course, the sting caused by stinging nettles is not fatal, or even dangerous really – just uncomfortable.

Being stung surely is uncomfortable. However, on the flip side, you might have a fun story to share with all your friends accompany with all the photos of how you got stung on Facebook. All right, maybe I am a bit over-optimistic, but it could be a fun experience after all. Let’s see what this tea has to offer.

Nettle Tea Benefits

One herbal expert illustrates that Nettle Tea has the following benefits.

Nettle has been used for centuries to treat allergy symptoms, particularly hayfever which is the most common allergy problem. Dr. Andrew Wiel M.D. author of Natural Health/ Natural Medicine says he knows of nothing more effective than the nettle for allergy relief.

Decongestants, antihistamines, allergy shots and even prescription medications such as Allegra and Claritin treat only the symptoms of allergies and tend to lose effectiveness over a period of time. They can also cause drowsiness, dry sinuses, insomnia and high blood pressure. Nettle has none of these side effects. It can be used regularly and has an impressive number of other benefits most notably as a treatment for prostate enlargement.

Nettle has shown promise in treating Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, asthma, bladder infections, bronchitis, bursitis, gingivitis, gout, hives, kidney stones, prostate enlargement, sciatica, and tendinitis! Externally it has been used to improve the appearance of the hair, and is said to be a remedy against oily hair and dandruff.

Of course, nothing is better than a personal testimony about nettle tea, and here’s an average guy telling us what nettle tea is doing for him:

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While you are enjoying all these benefits brought by Nettle Tea, you might want to consider the potential side effects of this tea as well.

 

Nettle Tea Side Effects

Nettle Tea fan Megan warns us to pay attention to the following side effects of Nettle Tea.

Drug Interactions

Consuming excessive amounts of nettle tea might result in undesirable drug interactions. “Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database” says some evidence suggests nettles can decrease blood sugar levels, and that drinking excessive amounts of nettle tea might theoretically interfere with blood sugar control. Nettles might also lower blood pressure and have an additive effect with antihypertensive drugs. In addition, nettles might suppress central nervous system activity and might increase the effects of central nervous system depressant drugs, such as those used to treat anxiety and/or insomnia. Some concerns also exist that nettles might decrease the effectiveness of anticoagulant drugs because they contain a significant amount of vitamin K, a vitamin that encourages blood clotting. Finally, excessive amounts of nettle tea might increase circulating levels of lithium drugs, so if you are on lithium, your lithium dosage might need to be decreased.

For pregnant women, be extra careful and consult with the doctor before you drink Nettle Tea since it might have uterine-stimulating and abortifacient properties. 

Are you ready to brew a pot of Nettle Tea? I can tell ya, the best way to make it is to make it from scratch.

How To Make Fresh Nettle Tea From Scratch

Greg, the Nettle Tea enthusiast shares with us the perfect way he makes his Nettle Tea.

How to harvest nettles

Wear gloves, long-sleeved shirt and long pants when hunting for nettles. Use a scissors or garden clippers to cut the top two bracts of leaves, leaving the rest of the plant to regenerate. Set a pot or bag alongside the plant and clip directly into the container. About a cup of fresh leaves is sufficient to brew a cup or two of tea.

How to brew nettle tea

Simply add water to your collected nettle leaves and heat to a near boil. Use about two cups of water for a cup of leaves; there’s no need to measure. You can make the tea stronger by steeping longer or weaker by adding more water. Once the water is near boiling, reduce heat and simmer for a couple of minutes. Pour through a small strainer and the tea is ready to drink. Some people prefer a small bit of sugar added to the tea, but I find the taste is just fine without any additives.

A word of caution

Any new substance should be introduced gradually to your body. A cup or two of nettle tea per day is sufficient to enjoy the benefits which nettle offer. Those new to nettle should start out with small amounts.

 If Pickwick, Peppermint, or Wu Yi are your regular cup of tea, try nettle tea today.